Amy Acker Fan

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Zap2it.com (2003)

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But before that, Amy Acker, who plays Fred, is set to wed actor boyfriend James Carpinello on April 25 in a winery in Northern California’s Napa Valley.

“Last year, it was everyone having babies,” Acker says. “I don’t know why. It’s funny, because we all have had pretty serious relationships for a while. I’m from Texas, and I’m the last one of my friends from high school to get married. They’re all like, ‘All right, already.’ So it doesn’t seem too scary.”

It seems Carpinello popped the question while Acker was visiting him in Australia on the set up the upcoming feature film “The Great Raid,” starring Benjamin Bratt, Joseph Fiennes and James Franco. The tale of the proposal is a bit of a saga in itself.

“The whole time I was there,” Acker says, “he was getting the ring FedExed from here to Australia. It was supposed to get there Monday, and I was leaving Thursday. Wednesday at noon, it still hadn’t gotten there.”

“He was calling FedEx, and they said, ‘Oh, it’s stuck in Customs in Sydney.’ Benjamin Bratt was in the movie, and he was about to send his assistant on a plane to go to Sydney to pick it up, because it was eight hours away.”

“But then, I guess, the Miramax people heard about it, so they sent their jet down there to pick up the ring and sign it from FedEx. They delivered it to the house at, like, 7:45 p.m., and we had dinner reservations at 8.”

“So he was on the phone all day, and I was like, ‘Oh, my God, is he cheating on me?’ Because he was like, ‘I’ve got to go downstairs to make a phone call.’ And I’m like, ‘Why? We always talk on the phone in front of each other.'”

“So it was really funny. Then it came, and I had no idea. It was great, on the beach, the full moon. It was very romantic.”

As for the wedding, Acker says, “It’s going to be 50 or under, real small, then we’re just going to have a party and invite all our friends.”

And the dress? “It’s sort of, let’s see, it’s a little period, old, ’30s or ’40s Hollywood. It’s real simple and floaty.”

Script developed by Never Enough Design